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Cat Care Plan to Ensure a Long and Healthy Life

July 17, 2017 by admin0
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From 8 weeks to 8 years, your cat’s needs are going to change with each passing year. This is especially true when it comes to her medical care needs. At the United Vet Center, our professionals want to help you keep track of what vaccines, exams and other procedures your feline needs, and when she needs them. However, this guideline can help you plan accordingly for your cat’s medical care, and make any necessary preparations prior to each appointment.

 

8 Weeks

If you are adopting a kitten, she will be 8 weeks old before you can even take her home. Be sure that you have a veterinarian picked out and an appointment scheduled prior to taking her home. Preferably, you want to take her straight to the vet before you introduce her to your family members or other pets.

 

You can also expect…

  • A comprehensive physical exam
  • First FVRCP vaccine
  • Internal parasite screen
  • Begin preventative measures
  • Felv/FIV test
  • Weight and body conditioning score

 

You can also expect your veterinarian to discuss with you proper diet and nutrition, what type of behavior to expect from your cat, appropriate toys for your kitten, grooming habits, litter box training and use and parasite management.

 

12 Weeks

At this point, your kitten will have been with you for an entire month. Congratulations! At her 12-week check up, your doctor will again rate her weight and body conditioning, as he or she will want to ensure that your cat is being properly cared for. They will also give her a comprehensive physical exam.

 

You can also expect…

  • Rabies vaccine
  • Flea & tick control
  • Second FVRCP vaccine

 

16 Weeks

At 16 weeks, your cat will undergo another comprehensive physical exam just to ensure that she is growing as is normal for her particular age and breed. Again, your vet will perform a weight and body conditioning test and score her accordingly.

 

You can also expect…

 

  • Nutritional assessment
  • Flea & tick control
  • Third FVRCP vaccine

 

4 to 6 Months

cats do not always look happy going to the vetAt this stage, your cat is becoming an adult. Now is the time to spay or neuter your cat if you don’t plan on entering him or her into a breeding program. Most vets recommend waiting until your cat is 6 months old to perform the procedure, but others suggest having it done at around 4 months. Talk to your vet to see what he or she recommends.

 

You can also expect…

  • Pre-surgical blood draw
  • Dental exam (any deciduous baby teeth will be removed)
  • Flea & tick control

 

1 to 4 Years

Once your cat reaches one year old, you will only need to take her to the vet once a year, assuming that she remains in good health. At these yearly checkups, you can anticipate a comprehensive physical exam and a weight and body conditioning score.

 

You can also expect…

  • Nutritional assessment
  • Blood work
  • Rabies vaccine
  • FVRCP vaccine
  • Optional vaccines
  • Internal parasite screen
  • Flea and tick medications
  • Dental work and polishing (if necessary)

 

5 to 8 Years

At this stage, your cat is entering her “middle ages,” and as such, will require more medical attention. To ensure that she continues to live happily and healthily, we recommend scheduling veterinarian appointments at least twice a year at this stage. Again, you can expect a comprehensive physical exam and a weight and body conditioning score at each bi-annual appointment.

 

You can also expect…

  • Nutritional assessment
  • Blood work
  • Rabies vaccine
  • FVRCP vaccine
  • Optional vaccines
  • Internal parasite screen
  • Flea and tick medications
  • Dental work and polishing (if necessary)

 

8+ Years

At this stage, your cat has officially reached old age. From here on out, it would be best to continue taking her to the vet at least twice a year, more if you notice any health conditions. She will undergo semi-annual exams, weight and body conditioning score and a nutritional assessment.

 

You can also expect…

  • Blood work (senior early detection)
  • Rabies vaccine
  • Limited vaccines (only as necessary)
  • Internal parasite screen
  • Dental scaling and polishing
  • Flea and tick medications

 

This guide should not be taken as medical advice, and you should always consult your own veterinarian about what your kitten needs and when she needs it. Additionally, take her to the vet if you notice a change in behavior, or if your cat is acting ill or injured.

Most felines develop dental health issues at three years of age, so it is best to practice good oral hygiene with her, such as brushing daily. It also wouldn’t hurt to find treats designed to clean cat’s teeth as they chew.

Finally, every breed is different, so look up specific information about your cat’s particular breed. Your vet should also be able to advise you on how to take care of your individual cat.

If you are thinking about adopting a cat or kitten, bookmark this page and share it on social media so that you can find it more easily when it’s finally time to take home your new pet. For ongoing tips for caring for your feline at every stage of her life, subscribe to our email newsletter; include your cat’s age and details regarding its breed for reminders about when it’s time to visit the United Veterinary Center.


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